Tagged: post season awards; american league

AND THE WINNER IS…AL

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Now that the 2009 Season is into the playoffs, it’s time for
this commentator to make his choices for post-season awards.

American League

Cy Young

Zach Greinke
was the year-long favorite and he did nothing to lessen it. He won 15 games on
a team that lost 95. What’s astonishing is that he lost 9 games that were
decided by 2 runs or less including two 1-0 and one 2-1 games. If he is lucky
in even half those contests, he finishes with 20 wins. His sparkling 2.16 ERA
was the lowest by an American League starter since Pedro Martinez posted a 1.74
for the 2000 Red Sox. Now before people say that he doesn’t deserve it because
he pitched on a bad team, remember those 9 two runs or less losses. Also, Steve
Carlton won the 1972 award going 27-10 for a terrible Phillies team that
lost 97 games.

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Honorable Mention goes to Felix Hernandez of the Mariners who quietly posted an
exceptional season – 19-5, 2.49 ERA.

 





MVP

There was a
reason the Yankees won over 100 games for the first time since 2004 and it
wasn’t the stratospheric payroll. 
They had
seven players with over 20 home runs and Derek Jeter set the
table with 212 hits and a .334 average, good for third place. But the MVP
goes to Joe Mauer. He won his third batting title, the second in a row . He
also for the first time added power (28HR/96RBI).  In 1942 the Boston Braves Ernie Lombardi won the title
hitting .330. He is the only other catcher in the history of the game to win it.
So it is indeed a remarkable accomplishment for a catcher to win three.

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Honorable Mention goes to Derek Jeter who hit .334 and set the team’s career hit record while being
the catalyst in the Yankees drive for the division title.

 

Rookie of
the Year

Gordon
Beckham
of the White Sox gets the award by a slight margin over the Orioles
outfielder Nolan Reimold only because the latter ended the season on the DL.
Both had similar lines so it is logical to assume that Reimold would have
finished with better stats.

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Honorable Mention
goes to the Rangers shortstop Elvis Andrus who at 21 played a critical position
and hit a respectable .267.

 

 

Manager of
the Year

Last year’s
choice was a no brainer – Joe Maddon. This year there’s a group of skippers
that are worthy.

Jim Leyland of
the Tigers kept the team in the race until losing the play-in game.

Joe Girardi
led the Yankees to a 100 win season in the pressure cooker that is New York.

Dan
Wakamatsu steered the Mariners to a winning record after the team lost over 100
games last year.

But the
award this year goes to Mike Scioscia of the Angels. Long overlooked because
the team in on the left coast, Scioscia is a players manager who uses his
talented roster to maximum efficiency. 
All he has done is take the Angels to the playoffs in six of the last
eight years. It’s time to make amends.

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Honorable Mention goes to Ron Gardenhire of the Twins who somehow finds a way to be in contention
with a low budget team. This year they had more ups and downs than the stock
market. They lost their cleanup hitter and two starters to injuries and still
found a way to win. Gardenhire has taken a bargain basement team to the
post-season in five of his eight years as manager.

In the next entry, I pick the National League’s winners.

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